News
JOB OPENING
The Natick Historical Society is seeking a part-time Director. For a full job description, please visit our News page.
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HOURS
The Natick Historical Society Museum is temporarily closed for restoration work and exhibit installation. You can visit our brand-new Museum in spring 2018!
Our new Research Library & Office is at 207 Union Street; please call for an appointment. Regular open hours will be announced soon. 
We are OPEN for public programs, as noted below.
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Monday, March 19, 7 PM
"LODGING IN WIGWAMS: THE REDEMPTION OF DANIEL GOOKIN"
Eliot Church, 45 Eliot Street, South Natick
Illustrated talk on the Englishman who championed and chronicled the Praying Indians of Natick.
The speaker, Thomas M. Paine, is a descendant of Daniel Gookin. Click for more info
Admission: Free for Natick Historical Society members and students; $5 for nonmembers
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For more information on upcoming events, please visit our Events page.

John Eliot: Apostle to the Indians

John Eliot (1604-1690) was born in Widford, England and educated at Christ College, Cambridge. He immigrated to New England in 1631 and was pastor of the church in Roxbury from 1632 until his death. Eliot  began preaching to the Indians at Nonantum in 1646, first in English and later in their own language. He was instrumental in the founding in England of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England by Parliament. He assisted in the organization of 14 Christian-Indian communities. Eliot also helped write the Bay Psalm Book and was the author of many other books and religious treatises, including the Bible that he translated into the Algonquian dialect.

Henry Wilson: The Natick Cobbler

Born February 16, 1812, Henry Wilson, vice president of the United States under Ulysses S. Grant, was known as "The Natick Cobbler." After his indenture was completed, he walked to Natick from Farmington, New Hampshire. Here he learned shoemaking. The shoe shop located near the corner of West Central and Mill Streets is a memorial to him. His home was at 33 West Central Street.

The Henry Wilson Shoe Shop is located on the corner of West Central and Mill Streets and is an example of a 'ten-footer'. Many homes had these small shops or ells where piecework on shoes was done. Runners delivered the pieces and picked up the finished work. This continued into the 1900's notwithstanding the concentration of shoemaking in the large factories of the late 1800's.