The Natick Historical Society is seeking a part-time Director. For a full job description, please visit our News page.
Our Museum is closed for restoration work. Please visit in the spring!
Our new Research Library & Office is at 207 Union Street; please call for an appointment. Regular open hours will be announced soon. 
We are OPEN for public programs (see below).
Monday, March 19, 7 PM
Eliot Church, 45 Eliot Street, South Natick
Illustrated talk on the Englishman who championed and chronicled the Praying Indians of Natick.
The speaker, Thomas M. Paine, is a descendant of Daniel Gookin. Click for more info
Admission: Free for Natick Historical Society members and students; $5 for nonmembers
Tuesday, March 20, 1 PM
History Book Club discussion:
Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy by Karen Abbott
Discuss the exciting lives of four women who were successful spies during the American Civil War.
Natick Community-Senior Center, 117 E. Central Street
All are welcome, no admission fee
Jointly sponsored by the Natick Historical Society and the Bacon Free Library
Sunday, April 22, 2 PM
"Boston's Baseball History and Natick's Contributions"
presented by Herb Crehan
Location: Morse Institute Library, 14 E. Central Street
Admission is free, donations always welcome
Sponsored by the Natick Historical Society
For more information on upcoming events, please visit our Events page.

Good Times & Bad: The Baldwin Photos & 1930s Natick

George E. Baldwin was employed as a freelance photographer in the 1930s, specializing in snapping pictures of notable events, crimes, and accidents for the local police departments  and newspapers.

In the 1990s, a stash of undeveloped film was discovered in the attic of a house on Plain Street.  The roll was donated to the Natick Historical Society, which developed the images to find over 200 of Mr. Baldwin’s photos showcasing views of Natick, Wellesey, Framingham, and more. The house on Plain Street had belonged to the Baldwin family in the 1930s.

Come see our newest special exhibit at the Morse Institute Library, on display in the historical exhibit case on the first floor until June of 2018. See the full collection of Baldwin photos here.


The Education of Henry Wilson

Henry Wilson is perhaps the most famous Natickite in our town’s history. Rising from humble origins, Wilson eventually became a Senator, a General, and eventually the Vice President. In a new exhibit at the Morse Institute Library, the Natick Historical Society looks to explore Wilson’s personal history, especially his education and how that shaped the kind of person he would become.  Largely self-taught, Wilson was a voracious reader, a master of public speaking, and an experienced writer. To learn more about his education and accomplishments, be sure to come by The Education of Henry Wilson, in the Morse Room. On display now through May 2017.


Natick and the New England Character

Natick was founded on an idea, and one based on the character of its people.  In 1651, Puritan missionary John Eliot and American Indian leader Waban created a community that was governed by Christian principles.  Their stamp is still seen on the landscape and in how Natick is still known today as the primary “Praying Indian” town in Massachusetts.  Over the centuries, writers, thinkers, and activists associated with Natick changed the course of American history, and in turn these luminaries and their works shaped how New England and its people were viewed by the wider world.


Traveling Kiosk Display: "Explore, Imagine, Investigate, Discover"

Look for the traveling kiosk display as you go about your errands around Natick. Alternating between the Morse Institute Library, Natick Town Hall, and the Community-Senior Center, it is a great introduction to the rich stories the Historical Society can tell using its special collections that are all about Natick history.